The Annual Rath Yatra of Puri

25.06.2017:

It’s the Big Day – The Ratha Saptami. Every year, on the day of Asadh Shukla Dwititya (falls in June-July), the spectacular Annual Rath Yatra or the Chariot festival is celebrated at the famous Puri Jagannath Temple. This is a possession of three huge and elaborately-decorated temple chariots bearing the three main temple deities – the Lord Jagannath, his brother Balabhadra and their sister Subhadra from the Jagannath Temple to their Aunt’s Gundicha temple through the Grand Avenue of Puri (Bada Danda). The preparations for this grand Rath Yatra in Puri starts two months before the main festival.

The environment around us transformed into a more lively one with the chant ‘Jai Jagannath’ of the pilgrims. More and more number of people started gathering near the chariots. The chariots are examples of the indigenous craftsmen-ship; they are riot of colors, culture and history. It is this occasion on which millions of people all over the world gather here to witness the magnificent possession! I managed to get into the front row just behind the police personnel to get a better glimpse of the chariots. They are not simply huge – the are magnificent indeed!

These chariots which are built anew every year were placed infront of the temple the day before. Adorned in brightly colored fabrics and mounted on giant two-meter-high wheels painted in festive colors, these three giant chariots will be built by the same family of craftspeople every year. The wood which would be used for making these chariots would be collected from a nearby village called Dasapalla. Over 150 carpenters build these two-storey high wooden chariots entirely by hand, and a team of 20 sculptors creates the woodcarvings decorating them. Important aspect is that these craftsmen still used their indigenous methods like hand spans etc and the tradition of making them is being passed down to the generations orally! 🙂

The Jagannath’s temple is surrounded by a lot of legends which makes it more special among the other temples in India. The deity here is said to be the truest form of Vishnu and called as ‘Neel Madhav’. Everything regarding the Lord Jagannath here is so special – as we know most of the idols in Indian temples are either made of stone or metal, here they are made of wood; the other ritual called the ‘Nabkalebara’ in which the deities shed their old bodies every 12 or 19 years to get into a new ones – proves us the eternal truth that even the creator has to die in this world! This shows that India is perhaps the only place in the world wherein which even the Gods die.

More and more people started gathering on the Bada Avenue. Though the princely states do not exist in India today, the heirs of the Gajapati Dynasty of Khurda still perform the rituals of the temple and the rituals of the Rath Yatra are conducted by Daitapatis, the descendants of the Tribal King Biswabasu, who was the first to safeguard the Lord Neel Madhav in a cave in his village. The rituals started inside the temple, I could hear the drum beatings and mantras emanating from the temple courtyard. Everyone is eagerly waiting to get a glimpse of the gods. Water is being splashed over us as the humidity started to soar up because of the increasing masses of the people. Ambulances and fire-engines were placed in middle of the crowds in case of emergency if any.

Though it was slightly raining, water is being splashed over us and the sky cloudy, we were sweating because of the suffocation. What all one could see there is only humans and humans everywhere – on top of the vehicles, terraces, mobile towers what not – everything was filled up with people! It was around 11.00 hrs, the first deity Balabhadara was brought out from the temple in a step-by-step rythm swaying in midst of priests and artisans beating their drums while singing and dancing. One can clearly distinguish among the deities chariots from their appearance.

The chariot on the extreme left, adorned in green and red cloth is of the Balabhadra is called the Taladhvaja which is 44 feet high and has 14 wheels. After, Lord Balabhadra had been placed in his chariot, his sister, Subhadra was brought out in almost a laid down posture was placed in the middle chariot which is adorned in black and red cloth called the Darpadalan or literally the trampler of pride. It is of 43 feet height and has 12 wheels. Now the crowd went surreal. The place was filled with more and more chants of Jagannath and acquired an aura of faith, tradition and devotion. Everyone’s anticipation is for the Lord Jagannath.

The conch-shells were blown, the dancers started performing the traditional Odishi dance, the drummers began to beat the drums more vigorously and finally our beloved God – the Lord Jagannath was brought out! It’s an incredible moment in my life to witness the Lord. Lord Jagannath was placed in his chariot called the Nandighosa which is 45 feet high and has 16 wheels. It is this grand spectacle that gave the word ‘Juggernaut’ (a huge, powerful, and overwhelming force) to the English lexicon! The rituals began to set off the deities on their journey to their Aunt’s home – the Gundicha temple, which is just 3 kms away from the main temple.

The deities would be placed there for the next seven days and would be brought back to the Jagannath’s Temple on the eighth day in the same manner. It’s believed that touching one of those thick 50-metre-long ropes which are used to pull these chariots during the Rath Yatra washes away our sins and helps in attaining salvation. Am still spell-bound watching this event!

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Puri – The Last Stop of Golden Triangle

Heard of the “Golden Triangle” of India? If not, here is a short brief on this 🙂 The “Golden Triangle” is a pilgrimage circuit which comprises of the Lingaraja Temple in Bhubaneshwar, the Sun Temple of Konark and the Lord Jagannath’s Temple of Puri. The last stop on the “Golden Circuit” Triangle – Puri is also one of the four great ‘Char Dham (the Purushottam Dham)’ pilgrimage sites and most sacred of India! I feel blessed for being arrived in Puri during a particularly auspicious time – the annual Rath Yatra or the Chariot Parade!

25.06.2017:

It was still raining by the time I woke up! Though it was a disturbed sleep all through the night, the charm of the city and the festival vibes that day made me feel positive 🙂 A perfect way to start a day! When came out the room to check on the guys, I was surprised to see Bhojnadh watching the rain holding a cup of hot tea in the balcony. Eshwar too was awake while Pappu still lay tucked inside his blanket. I asked the bell boy for a bucket of hot water for my shower and he simply rejected my request :-0

We got ready quickly and checked-out from the hotel to go to the temple. The roads were muddy coz of the rain and they were jam-packed with thousands of devotees who are proceeding towards the temple to catch a glimpse of the Lord Jagannath (God of the Universe). Every nook and corner is under the scrutiny of the Armed Forces, Para Military forces and the Odisha Police. The roads were filled up with barricades to regulate the movement of vehicles during these peak hours. Though we thought of parking our car near to the Railway Station, we ended up parking it on road-side, a little near to the temple.

After walking through the narrow streets and alleys, we reached the Bada Danda or Grand Avenue of Puri on which the famous Rath Yatra takes place. The Avenue is filled up with shops of all kinds and various ashrams for the pilgrims. Volunteers were providing drinking water, lemonades and fresh food to the thronging pilgrims and tourists. Further towards the temple, a huge crowd of people were competing to stand as close as possible to the temple in order to get a better view of the deities.

We too started walking towards the huge mass of people. The security forces had cordoned off the place near to the temple for around a distance of 800 mts. As we were closing nearby, we got the first glimpses of the mighty chariots and the temple tower. The great Jagannath Temple of Puri was built in the 12th century atop the ruins of the Gundicha temple by the progenitor of the Eastern Ganga dynasty, King Ananatavarman Chodaganga Deva and the temple complex covers a huge area of over 400,000 sq ft. The temple tower, built on a raised platform of stone to a height of 214 feet above the inner sanctum, is truly dominating the surrounding landscape.

The temple style here is quite different – it is mainly dominated by colossal cylindrical and pyramid-shaped towers rising skyward in multiple tiers, covered with elaborate stone carvings. A striking feature of the Jagannath Temple is the flag atop and it is said that it always flaps in the opposite direction of wind. Yet another one is the wooden deities! In most of the Hindu temples the icons of the deities are either made out of stone or metal, but here it’s wood and this is replaced every twelve or nineteen years ceremoniously.

Owing to the Rath Yatra, the temple is closed for pilgrims and entry into the temple on normal days is restricted only to the Hindus. This is the only occasion when people of all castes and creeds can catch a glimpse of the gods and hence the annual Rath Yatra draws close to a million of devotees all over India and the world!

Stay tuned!

Playing our cards safe with Eshwar ;-)

24.06.2017:

Eshwar’s plan was to visit Gopalpur on Sea and return back to Vizag, spend a day there and head to Rajahmundry – our native! But, Bhojnadh and I had other plans for him 😉 . Though we told him that let’s think about this on our way to Gopalpur, we didn’t get a chance to discuss it as we were quite occupied in rewinding our childhood and discussing our present lives! Once to Gopalpur on Sea, Bhojnadh and I planned how to persuade Eshwar with going on this trip further!

It was at this time, Bhojnadh reminded me that Eshwar is a bit religious person and the icing came as a phone call from Maithreyee saying that the Annual Rath Yatra or Chariot Festival of Puri is the next day 🙂 The card which we need to play is in our hand and the only thing we need is to find the right time to play it 😉 On our way back from Gopalpur on Sea to the NH 5, I told Eshwar that the Rath Yatra is tomorrow!

Bhojnadh took up from here and told Eshwar that it’s a matter of another 180 km and we would return back to Vizag after attending the ceremony. Eshwar, who was silent all this time surprised us by immediately saying an yes to the proposed plan :). So, there we go, the next destination – Puri! Reaching Puri is not a problem at all, but the issue at that point of time is our accommodation, as getting accommodation at the time of Annual Chariot festival is way too difficult 😦 We took a short break in the mid-way to stretch our legs and continued with our journey.

The signals were poor owning to the bad rain all through out the way and though I checked all the travel websites like makemytrip and goibibo, I couldn’t find any rooms available in any of the hotels in Puri. I called up Maithreyee and asked her to check in the other websites too to find some suitable accommodation for us. It’s 22.00 hrs when we all felt hungry and we were still to travel another 100 kms and it might take us another 2 hours owning to the traffic on that road because of the Rath Yatra.

We stopped at a roadside Dhaba, not a big one though, in fact we were the only customers during that hour. We ordered some roti, egg bhurji, aloo matar and some crispy fried mushrooms. The food is tasty, budgetary and hygienic too 🙂 Satisfied, we started with our journey again and proceeded to Puri. The road leading to Puri is narrow and way too dark. Except for a village or two here and there, there is not even a small lamp flickering anywhere else except the headlights of our car! It is as if a sea of darkness had engulfed the entire area. The road is potholed, it was raining continuously and there were no street lights or any lights along the road – one of the scariest roads so far 😦

Maithreyee informed us that there are few rooms available; gave us the number of the person whom we should contact and asked us to call and inform him that we would be a bit late! In fact we were late, we reached Puri only around 12.oo in the night as it took more time than expected because of the road. We reached the hotel and the manager told us that he had only one room and a common washroom. We rejected the idea of staying there and went around the place to find out if any other accommodation was available!

Owing to the rush of tourists and pilgrims during this time, it became really difficult for us to find accommodation. After inquiring here and there, we reached a small hotel where two rooms were available and we checked-in to grab some sleep before going to witness one of the biggest festivals of India!