Happy child- Nation’s Pride, Blossoming Lotus

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Denomination – 10 Paise (Indian Coin), Released in 1979, Composition – Aluminium,  Weight – 2.29 gms. The United Nations has declared the year 1979 as the International Year of the Child and India had played a significant role in this effort. The year was observed throughout the country through advocacy and action programs directed towards the welfare of Children. The National Children’s Board headed by the Prime Minister of India approved a National Plan of Action in this year to work in the fields of child health and nutrition, education, social welfare, legislation, publicity and fund raising. With the theme of the Action plan as “Reaching the Deprived Child”, a special emphasis was laid to ameliorate the condition of children of the weaker sections of the society. India has adopted a special slogan – ‘Happy Child – Nation’s Pride’/’Bacche ki Muskan – Rashtra ki Shaan’ for the International Year of the Child. The special symbol adopted for the year depicts a boy and girl with a sun and a slate in the background, in which the sun signifies the health and strength and the slate denotes the importance of education in a child’s life.

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Denomination – 20 Paise (Indian Coin), Released in 1968, Composition – Nickel Brass, Weight – 4.6 gms. The lotus is one of the most ancient and popular icons of Indian culture. In Hindu Mythology it is regarded as a symbol of purity and ultimate beauty. Accordingly, anything pretty and chaste is compared to this flower. Lotus motifs are often found in temple carvings, old palaces and ancient architecture as it is regarded as a sign of royalty. No wonder, it is regarded as the country’s national flower. The lotus grows in the slushy muddy waters of ponds and rises above the surface to bloom into a beautiful flower. Drawing from this characteristic, it is said that untouched by the impurity, man must also rise above his miseries and remain pure whatever the circumstances are. Lotus petals are so even that when water falls on them it simply rolls off. Hindu scriptures preach that sorrow and misfortune too must roll off our backs as water rolls of the lotus. This coin has a lotus in full blossom on one side while the other side hosts our national emblem.

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Kuka Movement and Komagatamaru..

 

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Kuka Movement. Denomination – 5 Rupee, Nickel-Brass, Back – Bust religious leader & Social Reformer Satguru Ram Singh.   A sect of Sikhs called “Namdharis” while reciting Sikh Mantras or repeating the name, often developed emotions, screamed and shouted, took turbans in their hands and hair streaming in the air and hence called “Kukas” or the shouters. The word Kuka is derived from the Punjabi expression ‘kook’, meaning a cry. The real founder was Baba Ram Singh, who was born in 1815 as a son of poor carpenter, in small village of Bhaini (Ludhiana). The principles of boycott and non-cooperation were expounded by Guru Ram Singh and in 1871, the Kukas met in conference at the village Khote in Ferozepur. The Kuka followers succeeded in enforcing civil disobedience as well as carrying out extreme actions including murder of butchers against cow slaughter. The Govt arrested many Kuaks and either hanged them or imprisoned them. There was a serious outbreak in 1872, when some of the Kukas went out of Ram Singh’s control and decided to attack Malerkotla and occupied it. The govt took it seriously and concluded that Ram Singh’s real motive and ambition was to reign and acquire dominions, upon a religious pretext. The result was that he was captured and sent into exile in Burma. He died there later.

The Komagata Maru was a Japanese steamship that sailed from Hong Kong to Vancouver, Canada via Japan in May, 1914. It was carrying 376 passengers who were immigrants from Punjab, India. Of these, only 24 were granted admittance in Canada when the ship docked in Vancouver. Following a two month stalemate, the ship and its 352 passengers were escorted out of the dock by the Canadian military ad forced to sail back to India. The ship returned to Calcutta on 27 Sep and was stopped by the British. The British thought that the passengers were law breakers and political agitators. The police fired shots and 19 passengers were killed. Most of the remaining passengers were either arrested or sent back to Punajb. In 1951, the Indian government erected a monument at Budge Budge to commemorate the massacre that occurred there. A stamp commemorating the centenary anniversary of the steamship was released by Canada Post in May, 2014.

Komagata Maru Incident. Denomination – 5 Rupee, Nickel-Brass, Back – The steamship. The Komagata Maru was a Japanese steamship that sailed from Hong Kong to Vancouver, Canada via Japan in May, 1914. It was carrying 376 passengers who were immigrants from Punjab, India. Of these, only 24 were granted admittance in Canada when the ship docked in Vancouver. Following a two month stalemate, the ship and its 352 passengers were escorted out of the dock by the Canadian military ad forced to sail back to India. The ship returned to Calcutta on 27 Sep and was stopped by the British. The British thought that the passengers were law breakers and political agitators. The police fired shots and 19 passengers were killed. Most of the remaining passengers were either arrested or sent back to Punajb. In 1951, the Indian government erected a monument at Budge Budge to commemorate the massacre that occurred there. A stamp commemorating the centenary anniversary of the steamship was released by Canada Post in May, 2014.

 

 

 

FABLED COINS

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Welcome to my new series. I think I chose the right title for this series as the two words in the title are two among my many interests 🙂 Fable, which means a short story and oh yeah, I love reading stories especially mysteries and thrillers 😉 and Coins which are so common in our life, yet making all the difference when time comes are like a crazy combo for me 🙂

I started collecting coins from my early days and still am into this habit. I feel proud to say that am an owner of a collection of coins of about 40 countries and bank notes from some 25 countries 🙂 . What interests me the most of my collection are the various stories that these coins tells us, like the reason behind having a certain emblem or motif on one side of the coin or the figures engraved on them to commemorate the various events of our history.

It is fun to collect coins as well as a way of learning things like the history of a particular country or knowing the great personalities of the old ages. As my blog is all about fun with knowledge, I am bringing out this idea of mine here. Hope this will become more fun by sharing your thoughts as well as mine 🙂 🙂 .

Love, T.