Important Persons

Louis Washkansky (1913 – 21 December 1967) was the recipient of the world’s first human heart transplant. Washkansky died of double pneumonia eighteen days after the transplant because of a weakened immune system.

Guru Gobind Singh (1666-1708). The 10th and the last Guru of the Sikhs who founded the Khalsa the inner council of the Sikhs in 1699. He is said to be the author of Dasam Granth.

Frederick Sanger
Born Aug. 13, 1918, Rendcombe, Gloucestershire, England. English biochemist who was twice the recipient of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. He was awarded the prize in 1958 for his determination of the structure of the insulin molecule. He shared the prize (with Paul Berg and Walter Gilbert) in 1980 for his determination of base sequences in nucleic acids. Sanger was only the fourth two-time recipient of the Nobel Prize.

Edmund Percival Hillary, born in Auckland New Zealand in the year 1919, was the first to reach the summit of Mount Everest together with Sherpa Tenzing Norgay on May 29, 1953. A man with a heart !! Died on the 11 January 2008, a sad loss to New Zealand.

Lance Edward Armstrong (born Lance Edward Gunderson on September 18, 1971) is an American professional road racing cyclist who is best known for winning the Tour de France a record seven consecutive times, after having survived testicular cancer.

Ball Pen Inventors: The Hungarian brothers, Laszlo and George Biro, made the first ball point pen in 1894. It followed the first workable fountain pen which was invented by L.E. Waterman in 1884.

Barb Wire: Joseph F. Gidden was born in New York on Jan. 18, 1812. He invented barbed wire in 1873 and was granted the patent on Nov. 24, 1874. After a three year battle over the patent, which he eventually won, Gidden became known as the “Father of Barbed Wire”.

Charles Richter-Ritcher Scale: Richter was born on an Ohio farm in 1900. He died in 1985.

Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801-1809) and the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776).

Dr. Hans von Ohain and Sir Frank Whittle are recognized as the co-inventors of the jet engine. Each was working separately and knew nothing of the others work. Although Whittle started first, von Ohain was first to design and develop a turbojet engine to power an aircraft.

Of the many honors received by both, the most significant honor was probably “The Charles Draper Prize” in 1992 which was given to both Hans von Ohain and Sir Frank Whittle for their efforts and contributions to aviation and mankind. “The Charles Draper Prize” is recognized as the equivalent to the Nobel Prize in technology.

Jacques Garnerin: Many people who tried to test the first parachutes died by jumping from high places. One attempt was a parachute hat, but the inventor broke his neck while testing it. The first successful parachute was tested from a hot air balloon in 1797, in France, by Jacques Garnerin.

Cadbury Chocolates: No one knows for sure when the first chocolate bar appeared or even who made it, but an important event occurred in 1828. The Van Houten press was invented, which extracted cocoa butter from the bean – the same press that brought the Cadbury Brothers success with Cocoa Essence.

Telephone: Alexander Graham Bell‘s notebook entry of 10 March 1876 describes his successful experiment with the telephone. Speaking through the instrument to his assistant, Thomas A. Watson, in the next room, Bell utters these famous first words, “Mr. Watson — come here — I want to see you”.

Genetic Engineering: Genetic Engineering, the technique of DNA cloning was perfected by Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer in 1973.

Bifocal Spectacles: Invented in 1760. A list of Benjamin Franklin‘s inventions reveals a man of many talents and interests. It was the scientist in Ben that brought out the inventor. His natural curiosity about things and the way they work made him try to find ways to make them work better.

Ben had poor vision and needed glasses to read. He got tired of constantly taking them off and putting them back on, so he decided to figure out a way to make his glasses let him see both near and far. He had two pairs of spectacles cut in half and put half of each lens in a single frame. Today, we call them bifocals.

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